University of Arkansas co-eds who took part in the Playboy pictorial on the girls of the SEC will be signing magazines in Fayetteville today. (Photos of the session are welcome. Send them to max@arktimes.com).

We thought anybody would have a hard-time outsmarming the DOG columnist who yesterday tut-tutted about such an activity on Sept. 11. (Sack cloth and ashes today, only, please. No sex, whatever you do.) But we were wrong, having forgotten John White, the chancellor of UAF, who’s every ready to pontificate even if his own moral code doesn’t include devotion to honesty. He harrumphs:

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People whose opinions of the university are impacted negatively are obviously missing the bigger picture of what is happening on our campus. While their actions are not endorsed by the university, nor do we encourage such actions, students are absolutely free to make their own moral choices and engage in legal endeavors as independent adults. However, I hope they do so with full recognition of the long-term impacts such decisions could have. Just as decisions regarding content in [social networking sites] can have long-term effects, so can decisions to be included in magazines such as Playboy.”

The indispensable Iconoclast (to which we are indebted for this report) has a wrapup, plus a link to the Traveler article on which Pious John pontificates. The girls use pseudonyms for protection, but said they were happy to appear in Playboy.

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“I do, because it’s more of a classy magazine, not trashy,” said one of the women whose pseudonym is Julieanne Hansen, a junior who is studying business.  …

Hansen said she’s not very concerned about stalkers because she has a false name. “I mean, I have a Facebook [account], they could possibly match my face up, but my profile is completely private,” she said.

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“I’m completely comfortable with this town – I mean this is Fayetteville,” Hansen said.

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