A spokesman for the Faulkner County Sheriff’s Office said that agents with the ATF and FBI are investigating a case in Greenbrier, following a fatal shooting last night in which responding officers found what the spokesman said were “homemade blasting caps” and other explosive materials at a home that was apparently being used as a hospice for the elderly. 

Faulkner County deputies responded at around 8 p.m. last night to a house at 149 E. Cadron Ridge Rd. in Greenbrier, after a man police have identified as Patrick Bauhaus, 18, called 911 to say that he had accidentally shot his friend, Jeremiah K. Hackler, 22, of Greenbrier with a handgun. Hackler later died at Conway Regional Medical Center. 

According to police, Bauhaus, Hackler and two other unidentified 18-year-olds were in the house at the time of the shooting, along with two elderly individuals who live there as patients of a hospice care center run out of the house. The elderly patients were not injured in the shooting, but were transported to the hospital to be checked out.

Faulkner County Chief Deputy Matt Rice said that while officers were searching the house following the shooting, they found explosives there, which included what he called homemade blasting caps. “We found explosive materials,” Rice said, “so we backed out and called somebody who knew something about that stuff. We ended up calling the Conway Fire Department bomb squad, the FBI, ATF. They came out and secured the scene for explosives.” 

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Rice said that Bauhaus was one of two 18-year-old caregivers who lived in the house and cared for the elderly patients who also lived there. Rice said the investigation into the shooting is ongoing, with several people, including the owner of the house, taken in for questioning. Rice said one female 18-year-old was been released this morning. Bauhaus is still in custody, but Rice said he has not been charged. As for the reason why explosives might have been present in a hospice facility, Rice said that’s one of the things the investigation hopes to uncover. 

“That’s the questions we have for them,” Rice said. “If you’re going to operate a facility like this, why would you have firearms and explosives in it?”