A reader alerts me to a Texas state representative’s request for an opinion from Attorney General Ken Paxton on the constitutionality of doing something with critical race theory in schools.

It is windier, but it plows the same ground  Attorney General Leslie Rutledge salted with a response to a virtually identical question from Rep. Mark Lowery. The coinicidence fits with the reports of dark-money financing of a national strategy to advance Republican candidates with this thinly veiled appeal to white nationalism.

Advertisement

Request by Texas Rep. James White:

Specifically, I request your opinion as to whether “antiracism” teachings or CRT practices may violate Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, Article 1, Section 3 and Section 8 of the Texas Constitution, or any other applicable laws.

Lowery’s question to Rutledge, an ally of Paxton in many legal efforts including the attempted overthrow of Joe Biden’s election:

Advertisement

Does the introduction of practices based on “antiracism” and critical race theory in Arkansas public schools and universities violate Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, Article II of the Arkansas Constitution, or other applicable nondiscrimination laws?

Minds thinking alike. Not necessarily great ones, based on what real legal scholars say about Rutledge’s work and the way the question is posed.

One difference: White is an African-American East Texas Republican, the only Black Republican in the Texas body. He’s an ardent Trump backer and is running for state agriculture commissioner.

Advertisement

But wait there is more: Same template in Montana in May. Campaign coordination, anyone?