DAYLIGHT SAVINGS: Two bills seeking to make Daylight Savings Time permanent in Arkansas failed to advance in a House committee Wednesday.

A pair of bills seeking to make Daylight Savings Time permanent in Arkansas failed to advance in a state House committee Wednesday. 

Rep. Johnny Rye (R-Trumann) and Rep. Scott Richardson (R-Bentonville) presented bills that would have made Daylight Savings Time permanent in Arkansas if the federal government changes the law to allow it. 

Advertisement

Rye’s bill would have required the state to adopt Daylight Savings Time on a permanent basis once the federal government allows it and once all of Arkansas’s border states have declared their intention to adopt it permanently as well. 

Rye pulled his bill down and asked that it be placed in interim study without any discussion from the committee members. 

Advertisement

Richardson later presented his bill, which would have required Arkansas to observe Daylight Savings Time permanently once the federal government allows it. Unlike Rye’s bill, the intentions of border states would not have impacted when Arkansas would make the change. 

Richardson’s bill drew questions from committee members who were concerned about children going to school in the dark on winter mornings, the timing of duck and deer hunting in the mornings and evenings, and the impact on border cities like Texarkana. 

Advertisement

A representative of the Arkansas Broadcasters Association said the state’s 138 AM radio stations would be impacted negatively because they are required to power down at sunset and can’t power up until sunrise. Permanently observing Daylight Savings Time would cause those stations to lose valuable drivetime and revenue, he said. 

Richardson’s bill failed on a voice vote. 

In March, the United States Senate unanimously passed a bill called the Sunshine Protection Act that would have made Daylight Savings Time permanent but the bill stalled in the House