Brian Chilson
WHAT A TURKEY: First Gentleman Bryan Sanders will bike from the Governor’s Mansion to work on Friday.

Arkansas First Gentleman Bryan Sanders is biking to work on Friday, according to a press release we received this morning. 

You might be a little confused, as we were when we received the news. He works? 

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According to the press release, Sanders will be biking from the Governor’s Mansion to the state Capitol on Friday morning as part of Metroplan’s Ozone Action Days. Sanders will ride along with County Judge Barry Hyde and Metroplan officials to kick off National Bike to Work Day. 

That’s all great, of course. Promoting biking to work sounds like a good idea. But Sanders is biking to work? And, if so, why the state Capitol?  

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Sanders, as far as we know, does not work. He holds a volunteer position on the Natural State Advisory Council that he was appointed to by his wife, Gov. Sarah Sanders

From what we can tell, Bryan Sanders spends his workdays following his wife and the Walton brothers around. Which is nice, in a way.

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In summary, it’s not clear that the First Gent is actually biking to work or if he thinks the state Capitol is his workplace, but three cheers for promoting biking and outdoor recreation. 

Here’s the press release:

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First Gentleman Bryan Sanders will join Metroplan officials and other outdoor enthusiasts in kicking off Ozone Action Days for a National Bike to Work Day ride on May 17. Metroplan encourages all Central Arkansas workers, both those who work in an office and those working from home, to participate in National Bike to Work Week. The week-long awareness initiative will culminate on Friday, May 17, with a ride led by First Gentleman Sanders from the Governor’s Mansion to the State Capitol.

Sanders will be joined by Pulaski County Judge Barry Hyde; Casey Covington, executive director of Metroplan; and Dr. Bruce Murphy, CEO of Arkansas Heart Hospital, along with members of local cycling organizations.

 

“We’re excited to partner with the First Gentleman on National Bike to Work Day, “said Casey Covington, executive director of Metroplan. “We are grateful for his efforts to promote outdoor recreation and tourism in Arkansas as the chair of the Natural State Advisory Council and his role in advocating for active transportation options here in Central Arkansas.” 

 

WHAT: National Bike to Work Day ride

WHEN: May 17 at 10 a.m. 

 

WHERE: Arkansas Governor’s Mansion

        1800 Center Street

      Little Rock, AR 72206

         Arkansas State Capitol

         500 Woodlane Street

         Little Rock, AR 72201

WHO: Arkansas First Gentleman Bryan Sanders

      Pulaski County Judge Barry Hyde 

Bruce Murphy, MD, PhD., CEO, Arkansas Heart Hospital 

Casey Covington, executive director, Metroplan

“Small changes like biking or walking to work can make a significant difference in our community’s air quality,” continued Covington. “No matter if you work from home or in person, we hope you will join our efforts to reduce ground-level ozone in Central Arkansas by using active transportation like biking or walking.”

Every year, from May through September, Metroplan in partnership with the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality and Arkansas Department of Transportation hosts Ozone Action Days to encourage the region’s residents to ditch the keys, use alternate modes of transportation, such as walking or taking public transit, to help reduce harmful ground-level ozone.

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