From "Red Dwarf," on Britbox IMDB

So you’ve been “socially distanced” for a while now and have driven yourself crazy trying to find something else on Netflix, Hulu or Prime that you might want to watch. What now?

Well, there are more streaming services than those Big Three. For example, if you have a hankering for British television, you might want to try out Acorn or Britbox. Recently, I’ve been binging on the Britcom “Red Dwarf” on Britbox, the story of Dave Lister, the lowest ranked and last-surviving person on a mining ship living with a hologram version of his hated, dead bunkmate; a creature evolved from the ship’s cat; and a sanitation droid. It’s hilarious, and the perfect show for a stretch of social isolation.

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If you need something more educational, you can get the PBS passport and stream both national and state PBS programming. Right now, the network is highlighting an old episode of “American Experience” on the influenza epidemic of 1918, appropriately enough. Another educational and cultural resource is Marquee TV, which streams ballet, contemporary dance, opera and theater. Marquee TV is currently showcasing its collection of Shakespeare performances, including “King Lear,” the play Shakespeare famously wrote while under quarantine. If you have a young student stuck at home with you, this might be a good resource for you.

Another favorite of mine is the Criterion Channel, featuring movies from the Criterion Collection, including “The Seventh Seal,” Ingmar Bergman’s classic meditation upon life and death during the time of the bubonic plague.

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If that’s a little intense for you, and if everything I’ve suggested just reminds you of current events, take a gander at Classix, which offers, for free, such classic television shows and movies as “The Beast of Borneo,” “Swamp Women” and “I Bury the Living.” Classix has a deep offering of sci-fi and horror B-movies, as well as “The Shadow of Chikara,” filmed in Arkansas, and “I’m from Arkansas,” reflecting the hillbilly tropes of the early 20th century.