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One vice of beauty is that it is very often boring. This is the case with “Arcadia Lost.” Visually, the movie is phenomenal — filmed in Greece, it’s a slow whirlwind of gold, blue, white, and yellow, sifting through a sun-drenched Mediterranean landscape. The camera lolls around the characters and drifts across the ancient topography, giving the audience the sensation that they are watching a memory. It’s a soothing thing to look at, a balm for the eyes.

But it is boring. Only the first 20 minutes contain enough intrigue of plot to match the film’s prettiness. Sixteen-year old Charlotte grieves the loss of her father and is dissatisfied with her mother’s marriage to a new man. She is a sly Lolita, lazily promiscuous, snappy and incorrigible. Her stepbrother, Sye, cannot figure out how she wants to be treated, so he hides behind his Pentax and innocently follows her around. The story meanders around Charlotte’s ennui and seductiveness until a car crash strands her and Sye in the desolate, rocky countryside.