Yuni Wa

Mainland Divide’s thrown their latest effort out into the universe, “Province of the Mind,” recalling the best bits of Ozric Tentacles in the vast instrumental title track and following that with a lesson in the diversity of sounds that a band can elicit when they’ve spent time studying the capabilities of their pedals.

Kudos to Darian Stribling at Blue Chair Studios (credited on the album’s Bandcamp page for having mixed and mastered the album) for preserving the crispness in each element. Without that kind of ear, there’s no doubt this hefty stockpile of guitar tracks could have easily become muddy instead of beautifully panoramic. See this band live as soon as you can, but until then, dig this. 
Minor Arcs’ video for “Breakup Violence” is about a year old today. It’s a layered instrumental track, brief and introspective, set to grainy footage from archive.org of children spinning on various carousels painted in almost exclusively primary colors, demonstrating the group’s bent toward the visual, likely a result of having Vince Griffin at the helm, a North Little Rock native who fronted the band Bear Colony and, full disclosure, was a former graphic designer at Arkansas Times.

The group has since released their debut EP, titled “EP01,” a solid collection of four electric pop tunes featuring only one title that matches the list of 24 songs the band posted on its Facebook page late last fall with the title “Minor Arcs Songs.” Here’s hoping that means there’s more to come.  

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Yunibasaru Wa, or Yuni Wa, is a Little-Rock based producer, sampler and rapper who’s produced more edits and albums than he has spent years on Earth. His latest is called “Ethereal Lover 3,” and spans from the straight-up caffeinated bounce of the opening track to the druggy “Chocolate and Cheese” brand of warp on “Burgundy” to a grainy jazz improvisation that sounds for all the world like it was recorded in the mid ’60s, “Look Into.”

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And, fading as quickly as it warped its way into the headphones, here’s a bass-laden, trippy throwback to the ’80s club scene by way of “Bathroom Angel,” half of a pair of tracks that make up Little Rock’s Fidel Castrato’s “Eternally Approaching Zero.”

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