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Posts tagged
'Ledell Lee'

Did Arkansas execute an innocent man?

The New York Times is the latest of many national accounts of evidence that Arkansas may have executed the wrong man for a murder in Jacksonville.
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DNA tests completed in quest to exonerate Ledell Lee, executed in 2017

DNA testing links someone other than an executed man to evidence in the murder case for which he was convicted.
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Consent order signed to reexamine evidence in Ledell Lee case

The Pulaski County Circuit Court has issued a consent order allowing the DNA analysis of evidence in a 1993 murder of Debra Reese for which Ledell Lee was executed by the state of Arkansas in 2017. 

Mother Jones on the fallibility of forensic science, and efforts by AG Sessions to halt reform

Given that we've been trying to execute eight men in recent weeks, with several of their cases hinging on forensic evidence collected after the crime, you might want to read this story from Mother Jones on the fallibility of forensic science, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions' decision to disband a panel of lawyers, scientists, judges, crime lab technicians, law enforcement officers, and academics who meet quarterly with the goal of putting more scientific rigor into evidence analysis and the courtroom testimony often used to incriminate and convict defendants.
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Department of Correction releases records related to Lee execution

The Arkansas Department of Correction has released its internal affairs log related to the execution of Ledell Lee on April 20.

Lee's lawyer writes about executed man's last hours

Lee Short, the lawyer for Ledell Lee, the man Arkansas put to death just before midnight last night, posted on Facebook the following letter of thanks for personal support and a bit about Lee's last hours, distributing his possessions and talking to family.
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Judge Griffen writes about morality, Christian values and executions

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blogs at Justice is a verb!, sends along a new post this morning.

The Ledell Lee execution thread

Arkansas Times contributor Jacob Rosenberg is at the Cummins Unit in Grady filing dispatches tonight in advance of the expected execution of Ledell Lee, who was sentenced to death for the Feb. 9, 1993, murder of Debra Reese, 26, who was beaten to death in the bedroom of her home in Jacksonville.
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Arkansas Supreme Court stays lower court injunction on execution drug, clearing way for execution of Ledell Lee

The Arkansas Supreme Court has issued a stay on Pulaski County Circuit Judge Alice Gray's temporary injunction against the state from using the drug vecuronium bromide in an execution. That clears the way for the state to execute Ledell Lee tonight.

Inmates' attorneys ask U.S. Supreme court to block executions

Today, the Arkansas death row prisoners scheduled for execution asked the U.S. Supreme Court for an emergency stay. Attorneys for the inmates also asked the high court to overturn the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit and uphold U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker's preliminary injunction.
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Innocence Project joins ACLU in requesting stay from state Supreme Court for Ledell Lee

Ledell Lee, scheduled to be executed Thursday night, has asked the Arkansas Supreme Court to stay the execution to allow time to do new DNA evidence that attorneys say could prove his innocence. Attorneys from the ACLU Capital Punishment Project and the Innocence Project joined North Little Rock lawyer Lee Short in the appeal.

UPDATE Attorneys for Ledell Lee argue they should be allowed to locate, test DNA evidence collected in 1993 as part of innocence claim

In a hearing this afternoon before Pulaski County Circuit Judge Herbert Wright, attorneys for death row inmate Ledell Lee argued that they should be allowed to locate evidence collected prior to his arrest in 1993, including a single hair and a Converse shoe with a pinhead-sized spot of human blood on it, for modern DNA testing. They hope testing can prove Lee's innocence by showing that the African-American hair found at the crime scene belongs to someone other than Lee, and that the speck of blood found on Lee's shoe does not belong to the victim in the case.
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